Grey Cup 101: Cold Weather Survival

A huge snowstorm slammed Hamilton, but the wintry weather wasn't enough to deter the fans. At game time, the temperature was -10°C, with strong winds and heavy snow. Equipment had to clear snow from the field before kickoff, and then again at halftime.

A huge snowstorm slammed Hamilton in 1996, but the wintry weather wasn’t enough to deter the fans. At game time, the temperature was -10°C, with strong winds and heavy snow. Equipment had to clear snow from the field before kickoff, and then again at halftime.

BY: Jeff Schneberk @Game7overtime

 

When it is cold outside, it is a lot harder for quarterbacks to throw the football, and a lot harder for receivers to catch it.

The game day forecast in Regina is only minus-2 but that doesn’t include the typical prairie windchill.

Saskatchewan should have the advantage when it comes to playing in harsh weather however Hamilton has gone through a number of games this season under heavy rain, and wind, and they won the last time they did it.

Colder weather will also turn more attention to the running games for both teams (Kory Sheets, CJ Gable are two of the names that you will probably see a lot of).

Here is a quick look back at some of the coldest Grey Cup games in history, starting way back in 1950.

1950: A late November snowfall blanketed Toronto’s Varsity Stadium the day before the 38th Grey Cup, now referred to as the “mud bowl.” Equipment was sent to clear the snow, but it damaged the turf. On the day of the game, warmer temperatures turned the snow into rain — creating a muddy mess on the field.

1962: Winnipeg and Hamilton went head-to-head for the 50th Grey Cup, also known of as the “fog bowl”.

The game was held at Toronto’s Exhibition Stadium, on Saturday, December 1st. The fog draped the field during the second quarter and became heavier as the game progressed. With 9 minutes and 29 seconds remaining in the game – and the Winnipeg Blue Bombers leading the Hamilton Tiger-Cats 28–27 – officials suspended the game until the following day, an unprecedented call in the game’s history.

1965: Winds as high as 64 km/h tore though the CNE stadium, prompting an historic change to the punting rule. Instead of punts being returned with a no fair catch rule, punts into the wind would be ruled “dead” when the returner touched the ball, a forced fair catch rule imposed by the weather.

1975: This was the coldest recorded Grey Cup in history. The clash between Edmonton and Montreal in Calgary featured a wind chill that felt like -30°C.

1977: The 65th Grey Cup is often referred to as the “staple bowl” and the “ice bowl”. Montreal received a healthy dose of snow the morning of the game. As the temperature dropped throughout the day, it melted, turning into a sheet of ice. The players couldn’t gain any traction, so the Montreal Alouettes regained their footing by adding staples to the bottom of their shoes — providing enough of an advantage to beat out the Edmonton Eskimos.

1991: This was one of the coldest Grey Cups played at Winnipeg Stadium, with a kickoff temperature of -16°C.

1991: This was one of the coldest Grey Cups played at Winnipeg Stadium, with a kickoff temperature of -16°C.

1996: A huge snowstorm slammed Hamilton, but the wintry weather wasn’t enough to deter the fans. At game time, the temperature was -10°C, with strong winds and heavy snow. Equipment had to clear snow from the field before kickoff, and then again at halftime.

@Game7overtime

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s